Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Obviously not from my garden

99-pound Canadian cabbage
Smart Guy sent me this picture yesterday, which made me go over to Reddit where he found it and see if I could find the story behind it. (It's linked under the picture.) But the short story is that John Vincent, a Master Grower from Ontario, Canada, grew this cabbage. And from that link, I found this little tidbit: "Vincent has been growing giants since 2004 and is one of three people in Ontario who have earned the prestigious Master Growers distinction." I wonder if it was as tasty as MY little cabbages. Whatever, the cabbage must have made a fair amount of slaw, don't you think?

The other thing I want to mention is the documentary that Judy and I saw last Sunday. It was about Rodriguez, a musician who was the focus of the documentary, and all I can say is that if you really want to be uplifted, see it for yourself. The story is almost unbelievable: during the early 1970s he wrote some songs that were recorded, even put out two albums, which didn't do well here in the States. He was dropped from the label, but his music found its way to South Africa, where it became the sound track to many people's lives as they fought against the repressive regime that supported apartheid. The story is very well told, and it is punctuated with many of the songs Rodriguez wrote that are still very relevant today. I also learned from this website that there has been a new album released of his songs. I'm going to get it, since the songs are still going through my mind. Here's a quote about Rodriguez:
In 1991, both his albums were released on CD in South Africa for the first time. His fame in South Africa was completely unknown to him, until 1998 when his eldest daughter came across a website dedicated to him. In 1998, he played his first South African tour, playing six concerts in front of thousands of fans.
There are scenes from that first concert that had tears streaming down my face. I am so glad I saw this documentary, and I hope if you get a chance to see it, you will too.
:-)

29 comments:

  1. that cabbage makes me laugh! oh my goodness!!

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  2. i am just wondering the size of the corned beef that you would need to go with it....ha....that is huge...

    and that documentary sounds really cool...i think i heard of this guy...or at least a similar story...will def check it out...

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  3. the cabbage is comical
    as is the expression on master grower's face
    he seems almost shocked :)

    thanks for checking on us and worrying about us
    hugs from me and Hope

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  4. Do you think the bigger, the better? As in, is it tastier than the regular size cabbages?

    I saw a segment on "60 Minutes" recently about Rodriguez. He really is great.

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  5. Forget the slaw from the big cabbage. It's all about "kraut"
    Amazing size of cabbage. Huge cabbages grow in the Arctic where there is some soul.
    Sounds like more of the type of documentary you saw need to be made.

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  6. I saw the review for "Searching for Sugarman", and it was very highly rated. Thanks for the heads up.
    And speaking of heads, that's some head of cabbage. I know there are places in Alaska and Canada where the long daylight in summer can create monster produce.

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  7. That is certainly quite the cabbage!

    Thank you for your recommendation about the documentary on Rodriguez. I hadn't heard of it, but it sounds like something my husband and I would be very interested in seeing!

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  8. Perhaps next year you can aim to grow a bigger cabbage than that one.

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  9. That is one big cabbage. I'm thinking like Red, that would make a lot of sauerkraut.

    The documentary does sound interesting. I'm going to look for it.

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  10. That cabbage is SCARY!!! But I'm sure it doesn't taste nearly as good as your smaller ones. ;o)

    And the documentary sounds really interesting! :o)

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  11. I'm wondering how he could NOT know about his 'fame' in South Africa...didn't he get royalties?

    And that cabbage....I can only imagine how bitter tasting it must be.

    [and by the way, Texas does have mail in voting --but only as a choice]

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  12. It is amazing and I wonder how one grows such a unique veggie. I wouldn't eat it, I would bronze it and charge admission to see it.

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  13. Now that is a cabbage - I wonder if the bigger it is the less tasteful it would be or perhaps I could picture it all shredded up for cole slaw - that would las a bit, or perhaps cut and frozen and added to winter cabbage stews, a fav in the maritimes.
    The documentary sounds very interesting and I am amazed that didn't know he was famous in Africa. Surely he would have made money from his work and did they have "Royalities" back then? Must check that out.
    Have a great day DJan.

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  14. Oh my goodness, what an amazing cabbage!!!!
    Glad you enjoyed the documentary, it's not often that we see quality film work anymore.
    Love Di ♥

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  15. I hope that huge cabbage provided lots of cole slaw or fried cabbage or something good for lots and lots of folks.

    Now you have me curious about Rodriguez. First because of his being a musician. And then the story sounds interesting. I will find it on Netflix.

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  16. That cabbage would make a lot of soup! Impressive. What does one do with a cabbage that large?

    I will check out that documentary. Thanks.

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  17. Wow, it looks like something grown at Findhorn!

    Rodriguez: onto my list it goes.

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  18. I don't really care for cabbage, but am impressed by the size of this one. Whoa!

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  19. Good grief! That would make a lot of coleslaw. I wonder if they actually eat it later.

    That documentary sounds wonderful. I'm glad he was able to get his fame while he was alive to enjoy it.

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  20. DJan,
    I just saw the story about Rodriguez on 20/20 or 60 Minutes (can't remember which). Pretty amazing and so humble.

    Wonder what they did with that cabbage?

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  21. Love to read stories like this post. Nice photo too. We had a contest for growing the biggest cabbage here when our kids were in school. So we planted one and favored it and it got big but it was also a feast for the white cabbage butterflies. Still, they left some for us to eat.

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  22. That cabbage reminds me of the ones I saw grown in Alaska--huge !!! Probably not quite as tasty..but who knows? I love cabbage!

    I'll look for that documentary. Sounds good.

    Warming up here today as both coasts are colding down. lol Gonna be 70 tomorrow...weird. Gonna make the most of it, though--oh,yeah..you betcha !!

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  23. I see a future for it in one of those Japanese B monster movies. THE ATTACK OF THE KILLER CABBAGES....

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  24. Oh yes I definitely will D-Jan. I don't see it advertised over here yet but I'll look out for it. I like that sort of film and this is a true story, right?
    That cabbage is amazing, just amazing. I've never seen anything like it in my life!!!!

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  25. Now that is a cabbage..would feed half an army:)

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  26. Dear DJan, I will look for the documentary at the theater or later from the library. Thanks so much for sharing it with us. Peace.

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  27. Dear DJan, I will look for the documentary at the theater or later from the library. Thanks so much for sharing it with us. Peace.

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  28. DId you know we saw a cabbage by the same dude at the royal?I emailed you a photo but not sure if I got it to you.

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